Writing Plan for the Week

No server access? Get out the Underwood!

Not having a plan is like not having server access. You get nowhere!

According to my business card, I am a writer. So what should I be doing tonight? Well, it’s Sunday night, the wind from Hurricane Joaquin has barely touched us, and the rain has slowed to a fine mist. It has not been the best beach day but at least we in Seaview have not been tormented by flooding problems. Other parts of the East coast? Not so fortunate.

Aside from the three church services this morning, and the potluck lunch, and the trip to the Brown Dog Ice Cream Store in Cape Charles, and a nap, and a fine dinner of grilled cheese sammiches, what else should I be doing? Lucy Silag of Penguin’s Book Country published a blurb about treating your writing career like a start-up, akin to business management for writers. I’m not sure she had these line items in mind:

Watch latest episode of Dr. Who? Check.

Make a fresh pot of coffee and have a cup? Check and check.

Post the recipe from the potluck? Check it out here.

Plan the writing for the week?

[insert cricket noises here]

Shazbot – I knew I had something else to do. Let’s try this and see what happens:

Monday – AM: revise query letter.  PM: read Matterhorn, written by Karl Marlantes.

Tuesday – AM: check QueryTracker for agents accepting culinary mysteries. Or mysteries. Or anything.  PM: Keep reading Matterhorn.

Wednesday – AM: Twitter-stalk agents and see what they like (and don’t like) in a query. PM: Keep reading Matterhorn and take mental break – yoga class.

Thursday – AM: Make decisions on agent queries. Customize and send. PM: no spare time.

Friday – AM: Research publishing through Booktrope and Book Country. PM: Keep reading Matterhorn.

Saturday – AM: Try to finish Matterhorn. PM: Read out loud the first few chapters of The Milk Chocolate Murders (to get back into that frame of mind.)

Sunday – evaluate the plan and make a new one.

There you go. That should keep me busy for a while. Will this work? Maybe. Will I follow the plan? Perhaps. Is it better to have a plan than not have a plan? Definitely.

Do you have a plan?

If so, please do share. And I’ll make you a deal. You give a short synopsis (is that redundant?) in the comments and I’ll follow up next week with how my plan went. I’ll even ask you how your plan went. We could call it…writers supporting writers! Has a good ring to it. Hey, it has worked with the Book Country Buddy Program. It could work here, too!

Looking forward to your thoughts!

DJ

 

 

 

An Interview with Author Janice Peacock

Leo Tolstoy once said art is “…indispensable for the life and progress toward well-being of individuals and of humanity.”

And judging from current events, we need all the art we can get these days. So what a rare treat it was to come across someone who excels in more than one creative field. I met author Janice Peacock through our participation in the Penguin / Random House online writer’s community Book Country. She is a fine writer of cozy mysteries that center on her “other life” as an award-winning glass artist.

Janice Peacock, mystery writer & glass artist

Janice Peacock, mystery writer & glass artist

Janice’s talent as a writer has been recognized by the literary world, and her first novel has just been released by publisher, Booktrope. Her second novel is currently in their production process so there is more to come!

Sad to say, due to my work schedule I was unable to attend her recent Facebook launch party, but I could not let this momentous occasion go by without asking her for a few words of inspiration. Read on, kind people. I present to you Janice Peacock, author of High Strung, A Glass Bead Mystery.

High Strung Final Cover Booktrope

You are an award-winning glass artist, with work on display in the permanent collection at the Corning Museum of Glass among many places. How did writing a mystery novel become part of your daily routine?

Several years ago I took at class at the Corning Studio in upstate New York. Since you are a cook, you may recognize the name Corning—they are the manufacturers of Pyrex glass baking dishes and measuring cups. While working in the studio, I had an epiphany—the perfect way to kill someone!

Janice Peacock & friends at the Corning Glass Studio

             Janice Peacock (back row, left side) & friends at the Corning Glass Studio

And while I didn’t have plans to murder anyone in particular, I decided that I wanted to write a murder mystery. As happens in life, it took me a few years before I sat down to write the story, but finally I did in November of 2012 during National Novel Writing Month.

Your main character is glass bead artist, Jax O’Connell. How much of you do we see in her? Run into any murders at the exhibitions you have attended?

There is a little of me in Jax, for sure. First, I’m a bead maker and have been for over twenty years. I love beads and making my own jewelry and I wanted to bring that joy to readers. Another thing that Jax and I have in common is that we love cats. Jax’s cat is a big grey fluff-ball with a bad attitude. Some years back, we fostered a litter of kittens that were just a few days old. I like to say “we took care of them when they were the size of gumdrops.” So, Gumdrop seemed like the perfect name for Jax’s cat.

But beads and cats aside, I think Jax has a desire to make things right, to fix what’s broken, and she’s driven—to find a murderer, to protect her friends, to lead the best life she can. And while I haven’t solved any murder mysteries, I do feel a need for things to be set right, for people to be held accountable for their actions. And, no, I’ve never found a dead body at an exhibition, and would probably faint if I did.

I know you have a second book in the making. Can you let us know when it might become available? And following on, do you have plans for more stories from the glass studio of Jax O’Connell?

Jax, Tessa, and Val will all be back in A Bead in the Hand, the second book in the Glass Bead Mystery Series. It will be released in mid-November this year. The third book in the series, tentatively titled Still Your Beading Heart, will be released in 2016.

As you become an internationally known, award-winning author, do you ever see the day when you won’t be making glass beads?

I think I will always make beads or work in glass in some way. I love words and writing. Even before becoming a novelist, I wrote professionally as an instructional designer in the high tech field. I often get tired of typing and watching words fly across my screen—words seem so intangible. I love going to my studio and getting my hands on real objects and making things that require a wordless part of my brain, allowing me to think about—to feel—colors, patterns, movement. I’ve always been a maker, and it is such huge a part of me, I can’t see leaving it behind.

Congrats on starting a relationship with Booktrope. They use a nontraditional business model, an almost flat hierarchy if you will. How’s the partnership coming along?

My experience with Booktrope has been wonderful. After they took me on as an author I was able to build my own team of professionals: a marketing manager, editor, cover designer, and proofreader. They have been a stellar team to work with on High Strung, and we’ll be working together again for A Bead in the Hand. The other thing I like about Booktrope is that I belong to a community of authors who share ideas and support to one another. Although I now have Booktrope to support me, I will still be working within the Book Country community to workshop my books and receive valuable feedback.

Finally, anything else you would like to add? Perhaps advice for struggling writers (or glass blowers since I know at least one who reads this blog.)

I read an article recently that referred to authors as artists and that thought has really stuck with me. I’m an artist working in multiple mediums: words and glass. So, my advice is the same for both kinds of artists: Do your work. Every day. Don’t just talk about your craft or read about it. Practice and learn. Make a hundred beads, write a hundred pages, repeat.

Thanks for taking a few minutes to answer my questions, Janice! I wish you all the best with your books. I have High Strung already and think it is a fun, captivating page-turner. And as for Gumdrop the cat? Well, let’s just say I know a cat here on the Eastern Shore that shares many of the same traits!

If you would like more information about Janice, her glass work, or her new series of mystery novels, you will find her on social media everywhere! Check out these links:

www.JanicePeacock.com

jp@janicepeacock.com

blog.janicepeacock.com

Twitter, Instagram: @JanPeac

www.pinterest.com/janpeac

www.facebook.com/JanicePeacockAuthor

www.JanicePeacockGlass.com

www.etsy.com/shop/JanicePeacock