Next stop – Procrastination Station

I know, I know, I should be fixing up chapter 2 of my Nano novel, Hell in High Heels, but instead I thought I would post some questions I always like to ask writers. Feel free to join me at the Procrastination Station. Answer any or all, if you have the spare time. (Spare time? Sure you have the time. You’re procrastinating, right? See? There’s the time!)

Questions to ponder:

  • Why write?
  • Do you write in one genre or cross-genre? Is there something wrong with the other choice?
  • Who do you think about when you are writing? The reader, the agent/publisher, the character?
  • Are you ever really finished with your book?
  • If not a writer, then what?

Don’t spend too much time on this. Remember – you are only procrastinating! As for me, it’s time to get back to work. Chapter 2 awaits!

– DJ sends.

 

 

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13 thoughts on “Next stop – Procrastination Station

  1. Questions to ponder:

    • Why write?
    Well, I write for a living. I’m a Copywriter, so I kind of have to write otherwise I don’t get paid! However, I do also write for pleasure. I love writing the blogs for Limebird and I loved the Nano experience. Writing just seems to be something for me that just happens, I can’t help it!

    • Do you write in one genre or cross-genre? Is there something wrong with the other choice?
    Again, I’m not sure if this is work related or for pleasure. Work, I write a bit of everything from finance to retail. Part of my job means being able to write on any topic. For pleasure, novel wise, I generally stick to this same type of writing. This normally is mainstream fiction with romance and sci fi elements. This is mainly because it’s what I enjoy reading myself. I would love to write something a bit different, but I wouldn’t know what to expect. For example, I would never be able to write a thriller or horror novel, because I would be too scared!

    • Who do you think about when you are writing? The reader, the agent/publisher, the character?
    Work – Reader and client. Pleasure – Reader mainly. Oh and the characters!

    • Are you ever really finished with your book?
    No, never I don’t think. I always find things that I want to change, but if you’re working to a deadline, sometimes you have to give in!

    • If not a writer, then what?
    Nooo, don’t say things like that! I don’t know, probably something in radio.

    That was fun, thanks! 🙂

    • I understand you dual writing life. I write for work often and it is not very thrilling stuff. Usually deals with numbers, percentages, trends. Good cure for insomnia. So I very much enjoy writing at home, since I can write what I choose, in the style I choose.

      Deadlines? Deadlines are the only reason I get things done!

      Radio would be nice. I have had people suggest I try radio, back in my concert announcing days. Probably a lot of fun, but I think I would still write. Probably about the craziness of radio!

      Great answers. Thanks for playing!

  2. Why write? – Why not write? 😉

    Do you write in one genre or cross-genre? Is there something wrong with the other choice? – One genre – suspense/thriller but for two audiences. YA’s and A’s 😉

    Who do you think about when you are writing? The reader, the agent/publisher, the character? – The characters (first draft) Readers (second draft to final)

    Are you ever really finished with your book? – No. I don’t think so.

    If not a writer, then what? Certainly not an English teacher. 😉 I don’t think there are any alternatives for me. Always a writer. 😀

    Great questions. Gotta get back to finishing my WIP now. 😉

    Procrastinators unite! 😀

    • Excellent responses! I don’t think I am ever finished with my work, either! And my English teachers would all agree – I would make a terrible one.

  3. Why write?
    I write because I have no other choice. If I don’t, I wake up as I am trying to sleep. I dream vivid dreams. I have to.

    Do you write in one genre or cross-genre? Is there something wrong with the other choice?
    My husband laughs and calls me a writing prostitute because I write in a various genres: technical, memoirs, fantasy, horror, historical, romance, and poetry. I have written instructions for repairing electronic equipment.

    Who do you think about when you are writing? The reader, the agent/publisher, the character?
    I write for me and for the character.

    Are you ever really finished with your book?
    Yes, I know when I am finished. It is usually when I am tired of the story.

    If not a writer, then what?
    Well – ummm – If I hadn’t gotten sick, I would probably doing something else. I used to write on the side. So the jobs I have done before my illness: typesetting, retail clerk, electronics technician, xerox technician, typist, proof-reading, etc. Many times (except for the retail clerk) I combined my writing skills with my job.

    So there you have it. I have been writing since I could hold a pen. Even before I could read, I would scribble. The first gift I gave anyone were scribbled poems at 3 years old. They had to have me to translate.

    lol Cyn

    • Great answers! I am always curious about crossing genres, mainly because I have been told I write mysteries well, but “you shouldn’t try [any other genre] because it’s just not you. Oh, and I can’t write a romance story because I am a man. Always love that statement, no pun intended.
      Typesetter? I started out as a typesetter in a shop that still had the lead slugs in the racks. What a fun time. I learned a ton about advertising & technical writing and editing in those days. Plus, I had my own light box for design projects. Of course, this was pre-computer days, so we literally did “cut and paste.”

      • I did typesetting in the late 70s/early 80s and instead of slugs, we used a typesetting machine very like a computer. But, we didn’t use the PCs that we have today. It was fun and a lot of hard work.

        I did typesetting for a nickel ads paper and a newspaper. I learned to dislike deadlines. We would work all night to get the papers out.

        😉 Cyn

  4. •Why write? — Because I don’t have enough skill as a visual artist or musician to share the gorgeous drama going on in my head.

    •Do you write in one genre or cross-genre? Is there something wrong with the other choice? — I tend to stick with light fantasy; don’t want to have to mind myself too much tothe possibilites of “real life” (and Sci/Fi seems like real life, only more technologically complicated, which I *so* do not need). It’s a personal affinity thing. If I could ever come up with something brilliant enough, I’d love to write a murder mystery or 60. More power to those who can write well in any genre. Expand that fan base!

    •Who do you think about when you are writing? The reader, the agent/publisher, the character? — The characters and, by extension, the story. An eye toward the readers, of course, since it’s my job to guide them through the laughter and tears in the right places. I try not to think about the agents and publishers until I feel ready to send what I’ve got; I’d probably overthink everything and stress myself out, otherwise.

    •Are you ever really finished with your book? — In the sense that I could never find another teeny word or punctuation choice I’d wish to tweak? I doubt it. I don’t feel like there’s any one perfect way for the book to be. There are major things to be gotten right, and limitless ways to be wrong. But whether I want this adjective, or a synonym — a dash, or a semicolon — is sometimes largely suggestive, dependent on how I’m feeling at the moment. So I guess I’m done when the changes I make don’t really change things, anymore, it’s just ansty-artist fiddling.

    •If not a writer, then what? — Miserable, initially. After I get over it, I guess it’s off to animation school to get the requisite skills to join the Disney team; I’d love to help them usher in a second Renaissance!

    • Nice stuff! I am with you on having drama in the head. I spent 24 years in the music business, but now have no outlet for that, so I took up writing for the same reason. Thanks for participating!

  5. A moment to procrastinate is always welcome!

    I definitely think about the characters while writing – and the scenes, how to balance them all.

    Is a book or story ever really finished? No. That’s what’s difficult because at some point you have to send it out there and move on to the next thing. I had a writing acquaintance who never moved beyond his novel outlines. That’s not the way to go. We have to finish things and move on.

    • It’s all about balance between the plot and the characters, to be sure. And finishing? Well said. In my old career (music,) every time I finished an arrangement or composition, I met ten players who said the were composers because they “have written this great intro to a tune – just need to write the rest of it.” Wordsmiths can be the same way, I guess.

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